kenobi-wan-obi:

aljazeeraamerica:


Radio Disney’s pro-fracking elementary school tour sparks outrage

An educational program funded by Ohio’s oil and gas industry and sponsored by Radio Disney has environmental activists – and some parents – up in arms over what they say is a hijacking of public education by hydraulic fracturing (fracking) interests, in a state sitting on billions of dollars’ worth of gas-rich shale.
The program, called Rocking in Ohio, went on a 26-stop tour of elementary schools and science centers across the state last month. It involves interactive demonstrations of how oil and gas pipelines work, and is led by three staffers from Radio Disney’s Cleveland branch. It is entirely funded by the Ohio Oil and Gas Energy Education Program (OOGEEP), which gets its money from oil and gas companies.

Read more
Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images


Boycott these fuckers.

kenobi-wan-obi:

aljazeeraamerica:

Radio Disney’s pro-fracking elementary school tour sparks outrage

An educational program funded by Ohio’s oil and gas industry and sponsored by Radio Disney has environmental activists – and some parents – up in arms over what they say is a hijacking of public education by hydraulic fracturing (fracking) interests, in a state sitting on billions of dollars’ worth of gas-rich shale.

The program, called Rocking in Ohio, went on a 26-stop tour of elementary schools and science centers across the state last month. It involves interactive demonstrations of how oil and gas pipelines work, and is led by three staffers from Radio Disney’s Cleveland branch. It is entirely funded by the Ohio Oil and Gas Energy Education Program (OOGEEP), which gets its money from oil and gas companies.

Read more

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Boycott these fuckers.

(via amodernmanifesto)

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"

[Mary Poppins author P.L.] Travers was a feisty, stereotype-breaking bisexual — a single mom who adopted a baby in her 40s, studied Zen meditation in Kyoto, and was publishing erotica about her silky underwear 10 years before Walt had sketched his mouse. Now that’s a character worth slapping on-screen, instead of this stiff British stereotype determined to steal joy from future generations of children. With her longtime girlfriend and then-adult son erased, this frigid Travers seems like she may not even know how babies are made. Maybe Mary Poppins could sing her a song about it.

Why does it matter that Saving Mr. Banks sabotages its supposed heroine? Because in a Hollywood where men still pen 85 percent of all films, there’s something sour in a movie that roots against a woman who asserted her artistic control by asking to be a co-screenwriter. (Another battle she lost — Mary Poppins’ opening credits list Travers as merely a “consultant.”) Just as slimy is the sense that this film, made by a studio conglomerate in a Hollywood dominated by studio conglomerates, is tricking us into cheering for the corporation over the creator.

"

-Amy Nicholson, on why Disney’s Saving Mr. Banks Is a “Corporate, Borderline-Sexist Spoonful of Lies”. (via infectedworldmind)

And this, in short, is why I won’t see Saving Mr. Banks.

Bi erasure, again. We do exist.

(via vaspider)

(via womenwhokickass)

14,867 notes

Shocker: Disney Teams up with Barneys to Create Super-Skinny Minnie; Suddenly Markets Their Newest Princess as Latina

Disney screwed up this week.  Big Time.  Twice.  Retailer Barneys has announced a holiday display featuring the Disney character Minnie Mouse, who has a disturbingly disproportionate and unhealthy body at 5’11” and a size 0. Wow.  But wait, there’s more!

This week Disney also announced their newest princess Sofia is Latina, but only after a blogger asked executive producer Jamie Mitchell at a press conference why Sofia’s mother has darker skin than any of the other characters.  When Disney first announced their new show Sofia the First, there was no mention of her race.

(via FeministDisney)

cafiffle:

ahahahahahhahahhahahha 

HAHAHAHA oh my god look at this load of bullshit propaganda

Walt Disney had to be taught how to draw Mickey Mouse by one of his animators (and how to write the famous Disney signature before every film).  

I don’t want to shit on anyone for loving Disney films, since I grew up with them too and although I find them problematic in some ways, I don’t condemn them as a whole because here’s the thing

they were created by a team of writers, animators, painters, merchanisers, etc (and still are, though now there’s a lot of 3D jargon involved as well)

Walt Disney was kind of a horrible human being.  He was a crazy, frightening, micromanaging boss, incredibly racist, sexist, anti-semitic, and when the employees who made his company the awesome thing it was went on strike for higher pay, he sold out the leaders to McCarthy as Communist and ruined their careers. 

He was not a nice person, or a sweet little dreamer who had a mouse character that ended up getting famous; he was a businessman, and he and his brother Roy ran a successful business. And they’ve done some amazing things, they’ve created some technically and thematically beautiful work, but HE PERSONALLY was not responsible for 99% of what we love about it.

so basically this commercial is horseshit is all I’m saying

If Disney movies made up a lot of your childhood as they did mine, I don’t see anything wrong with feeling sentimental towards them, as long as you also acknowledge the reality behind them— which is that the company they’re from is of questionable social values and loves nothing more than to manipulate its viewers to garner more money from them, and that the actual works of art you’re seeing are made by teams of talented people and not one (late) jerk who refuses to let any of them take credit when they win awards.

(Source: talesofawashedupmermaid)

23,984 notes

Disney's Princess and the Frog Can't Escape the Ghetto

Six decades after unleashing persistent NAACP bugaboo Song of the South (1946), and two after firmly suppressing it, that peculiar cultural institution known as the Walt Disney Company has made a symbolic reparation by creating its first African-American princess—and plunking her down in the middle of Jim Crow–era Louisiana! A patronizing fantasia of plantation life in post–Civil War Georgia, Song could at least be understood—if hardly excused—as a product of its time (18 years before the passage of the Civil Rights Act). But is Disney’s latest, The Princess and the Frog, the Obama-era fairy tale that anyone other than the “birther” crowd has been waiting for?

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Folks, Disney is not less racist than before because it tacked on a Black princess

The Princess and the Frog again: white folks that I know come to me in confessional and tell me they think the film was racist and they know it but like/saw it anyway and let their kids watch it. They still take their kids to Disney World at least once a year. Disney can’t get it right, so when are we going stop wanting and feeling like we need to be included in Disney’s fantastical, wonderful world? And when are our so-called allies going to join our staunch allies and just say NO?

Why does it have to be “I love Disney, but….”? You could just as easily flip that sentence around and say “Disney is racist, classist, and sexist but I still love it”. Those statements are alarmingly similar if you ask me.

Continuing with our analytical look at The Princess and The Frog, an insightful two part response to the film from Black feminist blogger Ms Queenly, deconstructing aspects of Tiana’s image and asking why reviewers consider “not entirely racist” to be an acceptable media standard.

Read Part One and Part Two

fixeruppr said: Hello! I just wanted to thank you for creating this blog. To be honest, it took me some courage to click the follow button, because for the past sixteen years of my life, I've been adoring Disney and its movies. I've known for a while that the Disney Corp. is definitely not as perfect as everyone makes it out to be, but I've always turned a blind eye to it. I'm ready to change that now—so I'm going to be reading every post and digesting the words. Thank you.

You are so welcome. This is a wonderful message to receive, because it captures exactly what I’ve always hoped this blog would be. I hope you continue to read, to question, to learn and to grow - and I hope FNDC plays a part in that for a long time to come. Thank you so much for this note.

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The Princess and the Frog and the Critical Gaze

What’s especially unfair about those who condemn blacks who criticize The Princess and the Frog is that whites, as a race, are not condemned as ungrateful or otherwise for critiquing the numerous white Disney princesses (or society at large.) Whites have taken Disney to task over white princesses’ independence, agency, body size, beauty, and intelligence among other things. There are academics and writers who have built a discipline out of critiquing Disney – particularly its princesses. While some whites now paint Disney as a desperate corporation scrambling to alter Tiana and assuage the endless demands of blacks, they fail to note how Ariel was the headstrong response to white complaints about obedient Cinderella and Belle was the feminist response to white criticism about willing-to-give-up-her-voice-for-a-man Ariel. Whites have made countless demands about their heroines, and Disney has altered their creations in response to those demands. Yet whites also know that if any given princess isn’t pleasing, in a few years another will be created. This is the first and most likely last black Disney princess.

Since the Disney’s Dolls article was a little out of date, here are some thoughtful points on race, expectation and entitlement that were written in response to the trailer for The Princess and the Frog. Over the next few days I’ll post some bits and pieces of the conversations which arose from that movie, and from Disney’s overall handling of their first only black princess.

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yourdesireismycommand-deactivat said: My friend worked at Disney for awhile. One of the rules for appearance she had to follow included no leg stubble whatsoever. She had to shave her legs everyday.

Wow, and I thought the designated length for fingernails was a little extreme!

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whuphf said: im sorry but why is the disney employee appearance code on your fuck no disney blog? when i worked at hollister, we actually had the exact same rules for men and women. and now i work at jimmy johns, a sub shop, and its the exact same rules, except girls can wear any color nail polish they want. its not a carefully controlled image, its called having a job and following dress code. and guess what, at most jobs where you directly deal with people, chewing gum and using a cell phone is bad.

Because one of the issues which many people have with Disney is the way that they code particular appearances as acceptable and others as deviant. There is nothing intrinsically bad about a business operating a dress code, or about being clean shaven as opposed to having a beard. However, a dress code is designed to send messages to the consumer about the type of business they are dealing with. When that business trades on notions of morality, wholesomeness, escapism and magic, and has the vast reach of somewhere like Disneyland, it is worth questioning those messages.

Why is it unacceptable for men to have long hair? What message does that send which Disney feels is inappropriate to their brand? Why are ‘conservative’ and ‘classic’ used repeatedly in reference to the styling of women’s appearances? What is that implied to mean? Why did it take until this year for beards to be permitted? Can you think of any ethnic or religious groups who would have difficulty meeting these standards? Can you think of any who would find it easy?

I generally try not to post closed statements, condemnations or ‘answers’ on this blog (except where it’s really cut and dry, like that centaur clip). Often what I’m trying to do is to draw attention to things about Disney’s business practise which otherwise go unnoticed, and ask people to question the company’s policies for themselves. In any case, I’m always glad to hear and publish people’s responses.

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